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Giving birth to a monster...


Today, I give birth to a monster. It can be a scary monster, or a monster hit, depending on how the wind blows, and depending on how you, as a reader, will take it.
This monster I call....BoholAnalysis.
Here, we discuss Bohol, not the way politicians would like to describe it, and certainly not the way tourism promoters would label the island.
Don't take me wrong.
This blog is not about the negative side of Bohol. It is a blog that talks about Bohol, critically, beyond the conventional labels. It is a blog about issues in Bohol and how an ordinary citizen like you, or me, views it, from a rather uninvolved and objective lens. It is a blog about Bohol without the hypocrisy, without the hype, absent the intended colors.
This blog is that of a black god, (see photo inset) sitting close to a pool of water, looking intently at it, trying to figure out if indeed the fishes are alive, or if it is just the ripples that create the movement.
If you can take this sense of nonsense, or better still, insanity, I bid you welcome.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Monster. Luv that word. This sure is one confident statement from one critical thinker you have become. But, of course, nothing incites me much these days except a few random selection of things that hit my 'untouchable button' and catch my almost-always-sleeping demagogic nerve's attention. To a person like me, who stopped believing in Santa Claus while most kids still do, monster is something I leave in the minds and the imaginations of Japanese anime creators. Although the world today may have seen some sightings of it here and there, Bohol is only known for miniature ones that only looks BIG, from our Boholano perspective, when highlighted. Just to let you know I like what you are doing but, please, always stay grounded. The real monsters are out there! (".)
Miko Cañares said…
Thanks for the reminder and the comment. Let's have coffee some time so that we can come up with a list.

The 'but' troubled me. I just hope i did not at all fly and touch your part of the sky, or worse, crossed your fence.
Anonymous said…
I love to have coffee with you sometime coz I really "dig" your style and write ups, but we may be ways apart I believe. Just like you (or may be not) I love to play with words and be critical in my thinking sometimes (but not all the time). I'd rather be lazy and do only what I love best which is not this type of writing... Yes, sir, you're doing just fine and we need minds like you so keep it up. I'm just playing a devil's advocate at times "but" I mean every word I say, too! ... No, you didn't cross my fence, my friend, unless I allow you too... but you're always welcome to fly and touch my part of the sky... it's free and I don't own it. (".)

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